Sept 9, 2021 Meeting Summary

September 9, 2021
Spoke Program: TBA
September 2, 2021
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Steve Morgan
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving: Tom Mangan & Ron Van Ekeren
Inspiration:
Professor’s Quote: Terry Roark
Foundation Flash:
Introduction of Guests: Hanna Eslinger
Guests: Pastor Eric Feuerstein; Steve Watt; Chet Lockard
Exchange Students:
Visiting Rotarians:
Junior Rotarians/RYLA/Young RYLA:
Rotaract/Interact Students:
Humor: Steve Morgan
Foundation Drawing: Don Prehoda won the $121.50 jackpot!
O’Dwyers Drawing: Keith Downey
Sept 9, 2021 Meeting Summary 2021-09-20 06:00:00Z 0

Sept 16, 2021 Meeting Summary

September 16, 2021
Spoke Program: TBA
September 9, 2021
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Steve Morgan
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving: Tom Mangan & Ron Van Ekeren
Inspiration:
Professor’s Quote:
Foundation Flash:
Introduction of Guests: Hanna Eslinger
Guests: Pastor Eric Feuerstein
Exchange Students:
Visiting Rotarians:
Junior Rotarians/RYLA/Young RYLA:
Rotaract/Interact Students:
Humor: Todd Pearson
Foundation Drawing:  
O’Dwyers Drawing: Keith Downey
Sept 16, 2021 Meeting Summary 2021-09-20 06:00:00Z 0

September 2nd 2021 Meeting Summary

September 2, 2021
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Steve Morgan
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving: Tom Mangan & Ron Van Ekeren
Inspiration:
Professor’s Quote: Terry Roark
Foundation Flash:
Introduction of Guests: Hanna Eslinger
Guests: Pastor Eric Feuerstein; Steve Watt; Chet Lockard
Exchange Students:
Visiting Rotarians:
Junior Rotarians/RYLA/Young RYLA:
Rotaract/Interact Students:
Humor: Steve Morgan
Foundation Drawing: Don Prehoda won the $121.50 jackpot!
O’Dwyers Drawing: Keith Downey
 
Announcements:
  • Steve Morgan announced that September 16’s presentation will be a Shelter Box update.
​​​​​​​Rotarian of the Week: Steve Morgan nominated Jamie Terry and Randi Downham for covering meetings while he was unavailable.  
 
Songs: Down by the Riverside; Edelweiss
Program: Laramie County 911 Tele-Communication, Amber Young
 
Introduction: Aimee Binning
 
Amber Young spoke about 911 call centers. The first 911 call was completed in 1968 and originally was a concept of the Fire Chief Association.
 
In Wyoming there are 34 emergency communication centers with 397 fulltime employees and 41 part-time employees.
 
Emergency Call Centers receive and dispatch calls, whereas Public Safety Answering Points receive calls and then coordinate with dispatch.
 
When a citizen calls 911, the call goes to a GPS mapping system to track the caller’s location. It then links the caller with the appropriate call center who can alert the closet first responders.
 
Call takers and dispatchers monitor radio screens across different frequencies.
 
Residents should call 911 if there is a serious illness or injury, if there is a crime in progress, or for any kind of fire. You should call dispatch for other issues.
 
Once you call, you should always stay on the line even if you made the call by mistake. If you do hang up, they will call you back or possible send someone.
 
The dispatcher will want to know who you are, where you are, and what your phone number is in case you get disconnected. They will ask different questions asked on the issue or emergency you are calling about.
 
This is a stressful job that takes a lot of public abuse, so 911 call centers are working on educating the public. They are also working on managing stress through more peer support, quiet rooms, and establishing EAPs.
 
There are a few related initiatives with 911. The NG911 uses IP protocol that supports text, photos, and video. It works on any connected device and can help them better help you. Wyoming is in the early planning stages with NG911.
 
The 911 Saves Act is a movement to reclassify these workers as essential and to be included in the First Responders Act. At this time the call center workers are classified as secretaries, but the high amount of stress, long hours, and low pay make it difficult to recruit.
 
911Der Woman initiative is training toward certification for women. IAM911 is a movement and podcast to educate laypeople about the extremely rough calls dispatchers have to deal with.
 
And, don’t forget, you can text 911!
 
Response: Ron Van Ekeren
 
Committee Signups:
Be an active Rotarian! Contact a board member to be placed on a committee.
 
Upcoming Events:
  • District Assembly, September 18 in Cheyenne at Laramie County Community College. Members can attend for $25.
  • District Conference, June 9-11, 2022 in Lander.
The Object of Rotary is to encourage and foster the ideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise and, in particular, to encourage and foster:
•FIRST. The development of acquaintance as an opportunity for service;
•SECOND. High ethical standards in business and professions; the recognition of the worthiness of all useful occupations; and the dignifying of each Rotarian's occupation as an opportunity to serve society;
•THIRD. The application of the ideal of service in each Rotarian's personal, business, and community life;
•FOURTH. The advancement of international understanding, goodwill, and peace through a world fellowship of business and professional persons united in the ideal of service
 
Rotary 4-way test
Of the things we think, say, or do
•Is it the Truth?
•Is it Fair?
•Will it build Good Will and Better Friendships?
•Will it be Beneficial to All Concerned?
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the public library children’s book fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
Like us on Facebook!
 
Spoke Editor: Caitlin White, 307-630-1965, cwhite@acplwy.org
September 2nd 2021 Meeting Summary 2021-09-08 06:00:00Z 0

August 26th 2021 Meeting Summary

August 26, 2021
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Jamie Terry
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving: Tom Mangan & Ron Van Ekeren
Inspiration:
Professor’s Quote:
Foundation Flash:
Introduction of Guests: Amanda Paul
Guests: Robert Stine
Exchange Students:
Visiting Rotarians:
Junior Rotarians/RYLA/Young RYLA:
Rotaract/Interact Students:
Humor: Todd Pearson
Foundation Drawing: Murray Schroeder won $10 with $104 in the jackpot.
O’Dwyers Drawing: Keith Downey
 
Announcements:
 
Rotarian of the Week: Jan Lawrence nominated Todd Pearson for his humor; Jamie Terry nominated Ron Van Ekeren for helping with meetings.
 
Songs: By the Light of the Silvery Moon; Bill Bailey
 
Program: Rotary Club Committees and Involvement
 
Introduction: Jamie Terry
The club discussed a few questions about activities, participation, membership, and committees.
 
First, the members discussed areas of interest for community impact we can expand on, suggestions for events and causes, and what our club should focus on.
 
Ideas presented were:
  • Affordable housing – distrusting fliers about rent assistance, providing financial literacy help
  • Key to attendance is quality of programs: limit number of non-profits fundraising and increase number of businesses explaining what they do
  • Mental health/veterans/suicide
  • School/education outreach, possibly increase or bring back Rotary Reads, partner with the library or schools
  • Have student interns go to businesses and non-profits to learn on the job
  • Partnership between public library and public health
  • Bring back a program where Rotarians taught the 4-way test to middle schoolers
  • Need to improve our image
The membership considered how to increase club participation. Rotarians should think through what they want to be part of and what committees they would like to join.
 
Many of our committees are in need of members since we have had several Rotarians leave the club. Every member should be serving on a committee to help.
Those in attendance went through the list of committees and needs for those committees.
 
Members suggested having requirements again for every member related to working the check in table, finding programs for a period of time, and serving on committees.
 
The meeting also included a discussion of fundraising activities, ideas for recruitment, and future topics.
 
Response: Jamie Terry
 
Upcoming Events:
  • District Assembly, September 18 in Cheyenne at Laramie County Community College. Members can attend for $25.
  • District Conference, June 9-11, 2022 in Lander.
 
Rotary 4-way test
Of the things we think, say, or do
•Is it the Truth?
•Is it Fair?
•Will it build Good Will and Better Friendships?
•Will it be Beneficial to All Concerned?
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the public library children’s book fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
Like us on Facebook!
 
Spoke Editor: Caitlin White, 307-630-1965, cwhite@acplwy.org
August 26th 2021 Meeting Summary 2021-09-08 06:00:00Z 0

August 19, 2021 Meeting Summary

August 12, 2021
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Steve Morgan
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving: Tom Mangan & Ron Van Ekeren
Inspiration:
Professor’s Quote:
Foundation Flash:
Introduction of Guests: Hanna Eslinger
Guests: Pastor Eric Feuerstein, Steve Watt, and Chet Lockard
Exchange Students:
Visiting Rotarians:
Junior Rotarians/RYLA/Young RYLA:
Rotaract/Interact Students:
Humor:
Foundation Drawing: Ollie Walter won $10 with $78.450 in the jackpot.
O’Dwyers Drawing: Rollin Abernethy
 
Announcements:
  • Steve Morgan announced that Chet Lockard’s application has been approved for membership by the board.
  • Keith Downey noted that there is still a little time to make a donation to the American Cancer Society for Relay for Life. The club is hoping to donate $2,000 total.
  • Steve Morgan told the club to be on the lookout for information about the upcoming suicide prevention 5K on September 25.
 
Rotarian of the Week: John Bard nominated Tony Hoch for making the final Relay for Life donation to get the club up to $2,000!     
 
Rotarian of the Month: Dave Hansen
 
Special Presentation: Steve Morgan made a donation to the club foundation for his birthday.
 
Songs:
 
Program: Bruce Alyward, Ted Talk on Polio Eradication
 
Introduction: Steve Morgan
 
**This Ted Talk was originally filmed in 2011. The facts and figures quoted are based on where polio eradication was in 2011.
 
Many years ago, people were terrified of polio. There were people living the rest of their lives in iron lungs. You contracted the disease and within days were completely paralyzed, including your breathing muscles.
 
In the 1950s, there was success with a polio vaccine that today everyone takes for granted. This was part of an extraordinary national effort in the U.S. to eradicated polio. The last case in America was in the 1980s.
 
Eradication managed to happen fast in the U.S., but this was not the case in many places, especially in Africa and the Middle East.
 
Then in the 1990s-2000s, there were polio outbreaks in counties where there had been no cases for years. Hundreds died as the disease spread to other eradicated areas. For example, Russia had cases in 2010 for the first time in a decade.
 
While these outbreaks are now under control, this disease is still developing and moving in other areas of the world.
 
The scientific miracle of this decade should be polio eradication because it needs to be snuffed out completely. The risks are massive, but the payout would be huge.
 
It would save over $50 billion over the next 25 years in small countries. To solve the polio problem, a massive social movement was crated that uses 20 million people per year to vaccinate over 500 million children each year.
 
This 2-drop vaccine must reach the most remote locations. Rotary International has been right at the center of this fight for over 20 years. Since then, there has been a 99 percent reduction in the number of children paralyzed from polio.
 
These volunteers are also providing other lifesaving medical help because it forces us to reach the most vulnerable people across the world.
 
Five years ago, polio started fighting back, and it could not be eradicated in 4 places and started to respread. They also noticed that the vaccine worked less well in impoverished areas. It is estimated that 200,000 people will be paralyzed from polio by 2030 if it is not eradicated.
 
In non-eradicated countries, they are uses mapping to chart cases by satellite and using GIS to track where volunteers are able to provide vaccines.
 
They also went back to the original 50-year-old vaccine and came out with a new vaccine that better targets polio.
 
Polio in 2021: In 2020, the World Health Organization certified the African region wild polio-free. Wild polio remains in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Rotary members have contributed more than $2.1 billion to Polio Plus.
 
Response: Steve Morgan
 
Upcoming Events:
  • District Assembly, September 18 in Cheyenne at Laramie County Community College. Members can attend for $25.
  • District Conference, June 9-11, 2022 in Lander.
 
Rotary 4-way test
Of the things we think, say, or do
•Is it the Truth?
•Is it Fair?
•Will it build Good Will and Better Friendships?
•Will it be Beneficial to All Concerned?
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the public library children’s book fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
Like us on Facebook!
 
Spoke Editor: Caitlin White, 307-630-1965, cwhite@acplwy.org
August 19, 2021 Meeting Summary 2021-08-24 06:00:00Z 0

August 5, 2021 Meeting Summary

August 5, 2021
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Steve Morgan
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving: Tom Mangan & Ron Van Ekeren
Inspiration:
Professor’s Quote: Jenny Eisenhauer
Foundation Flash:
Introduction of Guests: Amanda Paul
Guests: Pastor Eric
Exchange Students:
Visiting Rotarians:
Junior Rotarians/RYLA/Young RYLA:
Rotaract/Interact Students:
Humor:
Foundation Drawing: Steve Gosar won $10 with $71 in the jackpot.
O’Dwyers Drawing: Jean Garrison
 
Announcements:
  • Steve Morgan is seeking organizations to speak to about 911 services.
 
Rotarian of the Week: Murray Schroder nominated Jenny Eisenhauer for being on the cover of Foresight magazine; Steve Morgan nominated Ron Van Ekeren for troubleshooting the club technology.     
 
Songs: Rotary Wheel; Oh What A Beautiful Mornin’
 
Program: Rotary District 5440 Governor Nominee, Steve Sehnert
 
Introduction: Randi Downham
 
Steve Sehnart is the District Governor Nominee. He is a longtime Rotarian out of Steamboat.
 
Sehnart expressed the District’s thanks for our club and us as Rotarians. There are 1.2 million Rotarians worldwide. We have been at this number for a long time, so Rotary is working to increase its numbers. We want to make Rotary vital to communities.
 
He was pleased to hear about the Laramie Rotary Club park project with the City of Laramie. The Steamboat club participated in a similar project.
 
It is good to look into new fundraising ideas, to reenergize our membership, and to get all members to participate.
 
He encouraged club members to serve on a committee and be active. It is important to be a responsible participant and to develop new leadership skills.
 
That is the return on investment for membership, acquiring leadership skills. These skills will help you with your family, in your personal life, at your job, and as a volunteer.
 
Last year, District 5440 started at about 2,600 members across 53 clubs. Now the district is losing about 100 members each year, and because of COVID-19 many clubs are still not meeting. There is a need to rejuvenate the local clubs.
 
Our club has been fairly stable until now with over 100 members. Today our club has dropped to 88. Members. Sehnart encouraged us to get some of these members back by reaching out to those that have dropped out.
 
The Rotary International President wants each Rotarian to bring in one new member this year. To support this initiative, District 5440 will provide 100 Paul Harris Fellow points to members if they donate $100 and bring in a new member.
 
Rotary Foundation giving has also decreased. It donated over $300,000 last year. To increase this giving, the District needs more members. We have always exceeded our Foundation giving goal at the club. Last year, we raised just over $8,000 from our club.
 
Giving to the Rotary Foundation is important because it allows our club to apply for grants. This is based on a sliding scale for member giving.
 
One main objective this year is to work to improve the Rotary public image. There is a new campaign to do this. Members can attend a monthly Zoom meeting to learn more about how clubs can improve their public brand. There is help for projects and member recruitment as well.
 
The District is encouraging strategic planning. We have a plan at our club, but Sehnart advised us to put it out there more and share it with the community.
 
Clubs with strategic plans are more successful and engaged. The District has hired a consultant out of the Casper area to encourage clubs to get on board.
 
Sehnart reminded everyone of two upcoming functions:
  • District Assembly, September 18 in Cheyenne at Laramie County Community College. Members can attend for $25.
  • District Conference, June 9-11, 2022 in Lander.
Response: Steve Morgan
 
Blue Badge Requirements
  • Serve at the registration table for a minimum of three weeks.
  • Attend another Rotary Club meeting.
  • Attend a Club board meeting (second Thursday of the month, 11 a.m. at O’Dwyers)
  • Maintain 100% attendance for one full calendar month.
When completed report to the Club Secretary.
 
Rotary 4-way test
Of the things we think, say, or do
•Is it the Truth?
•Is it Fair?
•Will it build Good Will and Better Friendships?
•Will it be Beneficial to All Concerned?
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the public library children’s book fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
Like us on Facebook!
 
Spoke Editor: Caitlin White, 307-630-1965, cwhite@acplwy.org
August 5, 2021 Meeting Summary 2021-08-12 06:00:00Z 0

July 22, 2021 Meeting Summary

July 22, 2021
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Randi Downham
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving: Tom Mangan & Ron Van Ekeren
Inspiration:
Professor’s Quote: Randi Downham
Foundation Flash:
Introduction of Guests: Hanna Eslinger
Guests: Keith Downey introduced prospective member, Chet Lockard
Exchange Students:
Visiting Rotarians:
Junior Rotarians/RYLA/Young RYLA:
Rotaract/Interact Students:
Humor:
Foundation Drawing: Keith Downey won $10 with $39.50 in the jackpot.
O’Dwyers Drawing: Dave Krause
 
Announcements:
  • Keith Downey noted that the Relay 4 Life donation deadline is approaching. We have had about $1,500 in donations. You can still donate.
  • Kelly Neville told the club that the bingo fundraiser went well. We made about $400 from bingo, and brought in about $4,500 total between bingo, the silent auction, and the raffle.
 
Rotarian of the Week: Kerry Greaser and Ken Patel nominated the bingo committee; Dave Krause nominated Dave Hansen for his time spent volunteering for Jubilee Days.     
 
Songs: The Band Played On; Take Me Out to the Ball Game
 
Program: Wyoming Association of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Centers, Andi Summerville
 
Introduction: Randi Downham
 
The Wyoming Association of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Centers have 16 community health centers across Wyoming. Peak Wellness, which is now Volunteers for America, is one of these.
 
These are community-level centers that work with a regional network for services. It is difficult to provide full services at every location. The centers see about $100 million from the state for funding.
 
They offer mental health outpatient and residential and substance abuse outpatient and residential. There are many services across these four areas. The goal is to keep people in their communities to work through the crisis.
 
Ninety-five percent of services provided are for substance abuse residential and is provided by licensed health professionals. The centers work to keep people out of the justice system and try to help in the earlier stages for mental health and substance abuse.
There is not enough funding for this type of help in Wyoming because the state has high levels of mental health and substance abuse needs. Wyoming had 22 percent of residents in 2018-2019 that needed mental health help. Teens are even higher at 40 percent for anxiety and depression.
 
In FY19, the centers provided outpatient mental health services to 16,000 people and treated over 6,000 patients for substance abuse.
 
Since COVID-19, there has been a significant uptick in crisis. For example, Goshen County received 200 calls in a 7-day period, and new patients are coming in at a ratio of 2:1.
 
Wyoming is number 1 for suicides per capita, so 30 suicides per 100,000 people. This is extra high for the population size. WY has been in the top 3 for the last 20 years. There were 181 suicides in Wyoming in 2020. The pandemic has played a big role in these numbers.
 
There are several reasons Wyoming tends to rank so high. This includes that many small towns do not have resources to help; that Wyoming’s culture doesn’t allow people to ask for help; and uncertain economic factors. Instability related to jobs, housing, and financial stress can be triggers. Mental health also still has a heavy stigma.
 
Suicide prevention is facing budget costs and lack of funding. There is reform legislation coming down to make this more stable.
 
On July 1, 2022, there will be a new 3-digit suicide hotline number across the country. This number will be 988.
 
The idea is to have 24/7 coverage across the U.S. to help more people reach out to the right people. Many of these calls will be absolutely critical to responding to crisis.
 
The centers are looking at being able to offer mobile crisis response and more regional support. It will cost about $1.2 million to fund a 24/7 hotline every biennium. Mobile response coverage will cost an extra $10-$15 million.
 
There are current high levels of mental health stress in Wyoming. Alcohol is the number 1 addiction issue in Albany County, followed by meth. Opioids are also on the rise. The centers do not see much marijuana addiction.
 
Response: Randi Downham
 
Rotary 4-way test
Of the things we think, say, or do
•Is it the Truth?
•Is it Fair?
•Will it build Good Will and Better Friendships?
•Will it be Beneficial to All Concerned?
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the public library children’s book fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
Like us on Facebook!
 
Spoke Editor: Caitlin White, 307-630-1965, cwhite@acplwy.org
July 22, 2021 Meeting Summary 2021-08-12 06:00:00Z 0

July 15 Meeting Summary

July 15, 2021
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Steve Morgan
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving: Tom Mangan & Ron Van Ekeren
Inspiration:
Professor’s Quote: George Gill
Foundation Flash:
Introduction of Guests: Hanna Eslinger
Guests: Kristen Peterson introduced Sky Martin  
Exchange Students:
Visiting Rotarians:
Junior Rotarians/RYLA/Young RYLA:
Rotaract/Interact Students:
Humor:
Foundation Drawing: Sky Martin won $10.
O’Dwyers Drawing: George Gill
 
Announcements:
  • Kelly Neville reminded the club that our fundraiser is coming up quickly. Rotary Bingo will be July 15 at Bond’s Brewing. Social hour starts at 6 p.m., and bingo starts at 7:30 p.m. There will also be a silent auction.
 
Rotarian of the Week: Tony Hoch nominated Amanda Paul and Hanna Eslinger for keeping the meetings running; Kerry Greaser nominated Jaime Stine for being on the Jubilee Days committee; Jenny Eisenhauer nominated the bingo planning committee.    
 
Songs: I’m Looking Over a Four-Leaf Clover, In the Good Old Summer Time
 
Program: Albany County Sheriff Department, Aaron Appelhans
 
Introduction: Tony Hoch
 
Aaron Appelhans was appointed to serve the remainder of the Albany County Sheriff term about six months ago. The sheriff’s office provides 24/7 police coverage. It is budgeted to have 46 sheriff deputies and has lots of agreements for policing around the county.
 
The office also provides search/rescue, civic services, concealed carry permits, fingerprinting, VIN checks, emergency management, the fire warden, and the sex offender registry.
 
Appelhans is the top law enforcement person in the county. He is a public official. He is charged with keeping the peace in county, appointing deputies, handling the detention center, and manning court security.
 
There have been many staffing changes since he came on. This is all strategic to move the department forward and to be more innovative in the way it serves the county.
 
There were four empty positions when Appelhans came on. There are 10 now. To combat this problem with retention, he has changed the recruitment and hiring process. First, hiring has a broader reach and applicants can now apply online. There are about 10-15 applicants per pool.
 
The hiring process is focusing more on a softer skill set, since it is hard to teach people how to interact and talk to others. There is a greater focus on de-escalation and community relations, as Appelhans makes sure the department is aware that they are peace officers.
 
The department has reached out to underserved communities to minimize stereotypes and to up diversity. Currently 50 percent of the hires have been women.
 
This new hiring process seems to be working with its focus on mental and physical fitness.
 
Sheriff Appelhans has worked to expand and improve benefits. This means getting deputies competitive wages and benefits and securing funding for ongoing raises.
 
For future plans, Appelhans wants to focus on community relations and have a different focus on policing with trauma-informed investigations. He wants the department to recognize that there has to be the right demeanor and right questions asked when dealing with traumatized victims.
 
There are also plans for criminal justice reform and new partnerships. Appelhans wants to see a better response to mental health and more resources for proper policing.
 
The department purchased all new body cams and is working to create a digital ticketing system and a report management system. This will allow for more data-driven policing by putting crime data on a map so they know where to place officers on duty.
 
Appelhans wants to see better medical help in the detention center. There are 21 people being held there right now, and that is a low number. Alcohol is the number one cause of people being detained at the center.
 
For criminal justice reform, Appelhans is looking at use of force, systematic racism, biases and how these are applied in the county. The department will also look into for-profit policing, legal protections, re-allocation of funds, and the failures of the war on drugs.
 
Response: Rollin Abernethy
 
Rotary 4-way test
Of the things we think, say, or do
•Is it the Truth?
•Is it Fair?
•Will it build Good Will and Better Friendships?
•Will it be Beneficial to All Concerned?
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the public library children’s book fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
Like us on Facebook!
 
Spoke Editor: Caitlin White, 307-630-1965, cwhite@acplwy.org
July 15 Meeting Summary 2021-08-12 06:00:00Z 0

July 1, 2021 Meeting Summary

July 1, 2021
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Jaime Stine
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving: Ron Van Ekeren
Inspiration:
Professor’s Quote: George Gill
Foundation Flash:
Introduction of Guests: Amanda Paul
Guests: Steve Morgan introduced his wife, Amy Morgan; Keith Downey introduced prospective member, Chet Lockard; and prospective member, Quique Girones.
Exchange Students:
Visiting Rotarians: Michelle Tilley
Junior Rotarians/RYLA/Young RYLA:
Rotaract/Interact Students:
Humor: Todd Pearson
Foundation Drawing: Quique won $10 with $179 in the jackpot.
O’Dwyers Drawing: Tony Hoch
 
Announcements:
  • Kelly Neville reminded the club that our fundraiser is coming up quickly. Rotary Bingo will be July 15 at Bond’s Brewing. Social hour starts at 6 p.m., and bingo starts at 7:30 p.m. There will also be a silent auction.
  • Jaime Stine announced that Jubilee Days starts Saturday and runs through next Sunday.
  • Caitlin White told the club that the Albany County Public Library will be recreating the historic book chain and having a bookmobile fundraiser on July 8 between 6-8 p.m.
  • Jaime Stine announced that Kelly Neville and Chad Witte will be joining the board.
 
Rotarian of the Week: John Bard nominated Ken Patel for being back at Rotary; Steve Morgan nominated Michelle Tilley for jumping right in and handling the bingo fundraiser graphics.  
 
Rotarian of the Year: Tony Hoch
Special Presentation: Quique Girones and Michelle Tilley were inducted as new members. Welcome!
 
Songs: The More We Get Together; He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands
 
Program: Induction Day!
 
Jaime Stine thanked the club for a wonderful year. She is very appreciative of the good attendance during COVID-19 online and now that we are have hybrid meetings. She hopes the club will continue to successfully rebound.
 
One of Jaime’s goals over the year was to figure out a way to establish hybrid meetings. Thanks to the pandemic, this goal was successfully accomplished.
 
Jaime inducted Steve Morgan as the club’s new president. She presented him with his new gavel.
New President Steve noted that the Rotary International president this year is Shekhar Mahta and the theme is Serve to Change Lives.
 
While Steve is happy the club is back meeting, attendance is still fairly low and he hopes to work on that.
 
Projects are also changing for the club, as Wyoming changes as well. We need to change our approach to suicide prevention and take better care of our home club.
 
The new board for the year was introduced:
President – Steve Morgan
President Elect – Jamie Terry
President Nominee – Randi Downham
Director – Kelly Neville
Director – Chad Witte
Past President – Jaime Stine
Secretary – Hanna Eslinger
Treasurer – Amanda Givan
Steve thanked Jaime for her year of service and presented her with her Past President plaque and her Paul Harris Fellow.
 
Rotary 4-way test
Of the things we think, say, or do
•Is it the Truth?
•Is it Fair?
•Will it build Good Will and Better Friendships?
•Will it be Beneficial to All Concerned?
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the public library children’s book fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
Like us on Facebook!
 
Spoke Editor: Caitlin White, 307-630-1965, cwhite@acplwy.org
July 1, 2021 Meeting Summary 2021-07-06 06:00:00Z 0

June 17, 2021 Meeting Summary

June 17, 2021
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Steve Morgan
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving: Ron Van Ekeren & Tom Mangan
Inspiration:
Professor’s Quote: George Gill
Foundation Flash:
Introduction of Guests: Amanda Givan
Guests: Prospective member Quique Girones
Exchange Students:
Visiting Rotarians: Michelle Tilley
Junior Rotarians/RYLA/Young RYLA:
Rotaract/Interact Students:
Humor:
Foundation Drawing: Tom Wolfe won $10.
O’Dwyers Drawing: Tim Eisenhauer
 
Announcements:
  • Keith Downey noted that Relay for Life is still accepting donations.
 
Rotarian of the Week: Steve Morgan nominated Rebecca Miller for participating in Leadership Laramie this year; John Bard nominated Todd Pearson for being a softball coach.  
 
Songs:
 
Program: UW Haub School of Environment and Natural Resources, Dr. John Koprowski
 
Introduction: Tony Hoch
 
John Koprowski is the new dean of the Haub School. He started in late 2020 during COVID-19.
 
Koprowski discussed natural resources and the incredible connection Wyomingites have with nature. Everyone in Wyoming has a connection to the land, which is very unique and not the same in other states.
 
He does a lot of wildlife conservation work through research worldwide. Koprowski uses the purple bike approach to making a difference at the Haub School.
 
For example, he is involved in research in the Andes where the team is working to minimize conflict between wildlife and coffee farms.
 
There is now Andean bear safe coffee and Andean bear safe beef. This means these producers can charger more for the products because they are a verified vendor that allows the bears to move freely in their areas.
 
There is also work with Ganges River dolphins in Nepal and elephants and rhinos in Africa.
 
The dolphin research was with the World Wildlife Foundation. These dolphins live in freshwater. The problem was that the dams in this area generate power, but have caused significant change to river life. Because of this runoff is decreased so there are only shallow pools for the dolphins to inhabit and hunt for food.
 
This in turn has affected fishing. Dolphins often get caught in nets. The research is working to minimize this conflict.
 
Koprowski has also worked on projects where they work with a local community to transition the economy in an effort to increase capacity for the community.
 
In relation to the dolphin research, the research team worked to bring more people to the community through tourism to increase connections and build a different revenue source.
 
During this research, Koprowski met a family with a purple bike. The purple bike was used to take their kid to a school 21 miles away daily. The ability of the research group to help provide this bike made a big difference and allowed the group to connect to the local community.
 
In South Africa, there is an anti-poaching group made entirely of women. These women work 7 days on and 3 days off. To be part of this group generates civic pride.
 
Koprowski hopes to use some of the research from these projects to work statewide. There is a tiger and leopard project in Nepal that is based on a Wyoming pronghorn project.
 
At UW, Koprowski wants to encourage excellent enrollment and provide an innovative degree program. The Haub School has consistently doubled its numbers in its 12 years. It has a new Masters Degree in Environment, Natural Resources, and Society. It will also have a new collaborative space.
 
The Haub School is working to connect with leading economic drivers in Wyoming, and recently acquired an endowed chair.
 
The school has three Bachelor’s Degrees and several minors. It will offer more online offerings for continuing education and will welcome the return of inter-experiential courses.
 
The Carol & Ramon Tome Scholars to Fellows Program includes a top 10 great lecture series, a scholarship program, and an eventual fellowship program.
 
Response: Caitlin White

Rotary 4-way test
Of the things we think, say, or do
•Is it the Truth?
•Is it Fair?
•Will it build Good Will and Better Friendships?
•Will it be Beneficial to All Concerned?
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the public library children’s book fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
Like us on Facebook!
 
Spoke Editor: Caitlin White, 307-630-1965, cwhite@acplwy.org
June 17, 2021 Meeting Summary 2021-06-26 06:00:00Z 0

June 10, 2021 Meeting Summary

June 10, 2021
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Jaime Stine
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving: Ron Van Ekeren
Inspiration: Steve Morgan
Professor’s Quote:
Foundation Flash:
Introduction of Guests: Hanna Eslinger
Steve Morgan introduced his wife, Amy. UW Alumni Association guests: Marissa Riley, Heather Baker, Emily Vernon, Chance Price, Chrissy Herschler
Guests: Prospective member Quique Girones
Exchange Students:
Visiting Rotarians: Michelle Tilley
Junior Rotarians/RYLA/Young RYLA:
Rotaract/Interact Students:
Humor: Todd Pearson
Foundation Drawing: Tim Eisenhauer won $10.
O’Dwyers Drawing: Murray Schroeder
 
Announcements:
  • Steve Morgan asked Rotarians to consider helping with finding dynamic speakers. The club also needs program committee coordinators.
  • Tim Eisenhauer told the club there are no RYLA camps this year, but they are doing a 1-day virtual event. Applications are due by June 30.
  • Randi Downham announced that the club will be doing a bingo fundraiser on July 15 at Bonds Brewing. More details will come by email.
  • Jaime Stine noted that the club is reviewing two new member applications.
 
Rotarian of the Week: Jaime Stine nominated Steve Morgan for bringing a table full of guests and for busily prepping for next year.
 
Rotarian of the Month: Rollin Abernethy
 
Songs: Happy Wanderer
 
Program: Keener Fry, UW Alumni Association
 
Introduction: Steve Morgan
 
The mission of the UW Alumni Association is to be a pathway to share the pride, passion, and legacy of UW with alums around the world. The association works to preserve traditions while looking forward and building community.
 
The Alumni Association has groups and connections across the country. It provides opportunity through workforce career services. The Alumni Association gives a boost to admissions work by writing personal notes to prospective students. This is the Admitted Student Writing Project. About 400 volunteers write to about 300 students. COVID-19 made the last year difficult so creating more personal connections was important.
 
There are 140,000 living alums from UW. Some of the strongest alum networks are in nursing and men’s rugby. The Norwegian alumnus are having an event this summer.
 
In 2020-2021, the association help 40 virtual events with 14,000 alumni.
 
 
The Cowboy2Cowboy Info Interview is a newer program to connect current graduates with alumni. This helps graduates be more successful and have help finding jobs.
 
This program has 35 different careers captured in different videos that describe professions. These have led to jobs for graduates.
 
There is a high value to being a UW student and alumni. The association works to support the UW pillars of forward thinking, becoming more digital, entrepreneurship, and promoting interdisciplinary work.
 
The Alumni Association has events coming back this fall. There is a 5K scheduled for June called Tracing Our Roots. It is free.
 
There will also be kickoff Friday celebrations, a road series reception, and Homecoming.
 
The Alumni Association was launched in 1895. It’s cornerstone values are: engagement relationships, loyalty, innovation, tradition, ethical service, and Brown & Gold.
 
Response: Rollin Abernethy

Rotary 4-way test
Of the things we think, say, or do
•Is it the Truth?
•Is it Fair?
•Will it build Good Will and Better Friendships?
•Will it be Beneficial to All Concerned?
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the public library children’s book fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
Like us on Facebook!
 
Spoke Editor: Caitlin White, 307-630-1965, cwhite@acplwy.org
June 10, 2021 Meeting Summary 2021-06-16 06:00:00Z 0

May 27 2021 Meeting Summary

May 27, 2021
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Jaime Stine
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving:
Inspiration: Larry Struempf
Professor’s Quote:
Foundation Flash:
Introduction of Guests:
Guests:
Exchange Students:
Visiting Rotarians:
Junior Rotarians/RYLA/Young RYLA:
Rotaract/Interact Students:
Humor: Terry Roark
Foundation Drawing: Murray Schroeder
O’Dwyers Drawing: Don Prehoda
 
Announcements:
  • Keith Downey provided an update on Relay for Life.  The Club is donating $500.  Individual donations are up to $1,250.  He would like to see it at or above $2,000.  He shared from an article on the war on cancer and the impactful things that donations to this program support.
  • President Jaime shared that Todd Pearson recently celebrated a birthday and provided a donation check to the foundation.
  • President Jaime reminded the club that we are approaching the fiscal year end and called on the club members to consider becoming a Paul Harris fellow.  Donations also help the club maintain eligibility for district grants.  Donations must be received by June 30 to count for this year.
  • Rollin Abernethy reiterated that our club is short on contributions which puts our club at risk to not be eligible for district grants.
 
Rotarian of the Week: Tom Mangan nominated Keith Downey for his work with Relay for Life.
 
Songs:
 
Program: Pivotal Moments in Transnational Peace
 
Introduction: Rollin Abernethy
 
Elizabeth Stephani is a UW Law student and scholarship applicant.  She is working toward a global scholarship application through Rotary International.  The program she was going to participate in previously was not long enough to qualify.  She will likely still pursue in a different way.
 
Elizabeth refers to herself as a Native of the American West.  She has experience in facilitating working sessions and more formal discussions among tribes.  She has a passion for environmental studies and has authored an article that has been published, the “Wind River Dumps: Trash to Treasure.”
 
Elizabeth shared that there is currently a lot of research interest in Chili across the industry.  It is a country that relies on exportation of natural resources.  The country is also of interest to private sector mining groups.  Approximately 52% of the country’s exports are copper. 
 
Complimenting the level of research interest is the shift in constitution in the country.  Chile is preparing to review and update their constitution, which creates opportunity for business interests in Chile’s entrance to the world economy.
 
Elizabeth is proposing she travel to Chile in January 2022 with the University of Wyoming Law School. With this program, she would attend as a student, alongside students from Chile.  And, would have classes taught by both professors from the University of Wyoming as well as from Chile.
 
She prepared an estimated budget for travel and for the program costs.  She is asking Rotary to partner with her to promote peacebuilding in Chile.  Along with her perspective, she hopes to bring together leaders and facilitate conversations that include human rights issues inter-woven with environmental rights.
 
In Q&A, Elizabeth shared that she took 4 years of Spanish in high school and will be seeking a tutor this summer to improve her fluency, as that will help in discussions.  She also shared that while she was seeking a global grant for this research and now will seek other ways to accomplish this as well, that she is also looking at a law firm Clerkship opportunity.  She will look for ways to extend this research while she explores next steps and views this program as a launching point.  Elizabeth also shared that she would enjoy publishing again.
 
 
Response: Jaime Stine

Rotary 4-way test
Of the things we think, say, or do
•Is it the Truth?
•Is it Fair?
•Will it build Good Will and Better Friendships?
•Will it be Beneficial to All Concerned?
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the public library children’s book fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
Like us on Facebook!
 
Spoke Editor: Caitlin White, 307-630-1965, cwhite@acplwy.org
May 27 2021 Meeting Summary 2021-06-01 06:00:00Z 0

May 13, 2021 Meeting Summary

May 13, 2021
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Jaime Stine
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving:
Inspiration:
Professor’s Quote:
Foundation Flash:
Introduction of Guests:
Guests: Aaron Maddox, Karen Bard
Exchange Students:
Visiting Rotarians:
Junior Rotarians/RYLA/Young RYLA:
Rotaract/Interact Students:
Humor:
Foundation Drawing:
O’Dwyers Drawing:
 
Announcements:
  • Tom Mangan told the club that the MS Walk is next weekend in Cheyenne. Our Rotary team has raised $4,400, and the club will provide a $400 donation.
  • Virtual District Conference registration is open. Sign up today!
  • Sunrise Rotary is planning a fundraiser for June 12.
Rotarian of the Week: Tim Stamp for his passion and hard work at the airport.
 
Songs:
 
Program: Laramie Regional Airport, Tim Stamp
 
Introduction:
 
The Laramie Regional Airport renovation is complete. The airport is working on a master plan for the next 5-20 years. The airport wants to become the gateway to Laramie.
 
The prior terminal was always packed and there was no room for people to sit. The terminal was basically taken to ground and rebuilt. It is 14,000 SF. The terminal is much more open and comfortable.
 
The building was built to last 20-50 y ears. It will have new airplanes in the near future that boost passenger capacity to 70 and then to 90-100. While the terminal may seem big now, it is built to take on this increased capacity.
 
The same crew that handles baggage also handles the TSA security area. This company is SkyWest. SkyWest also decides on the flight times. There is a 6 a.m. flight that is expected to be moved to 8 a.m. There is also a 1 p.m. flight.
 
The flight that gets into Laramie at 8:30/9 p.m. stays overnight. The crew and plane then leave the next day.
 
Laramie Regional Airport was designed to make it special with touches of comfort and local life. There is the boot wall that says, “Good Boots Take You Good Places” where passengers can easily remove and put on shoes. It also shows things to do in Laramie and the surrounding areas.
 
The holding room has charging stations throughout and can hold 93 people on seats. Additional seating is also available.
 
More flights can now be diverted to the airport because of the capacity increase. Laramie Regional Airport does get referrals from Denver, mostly from weather.
 
The airport is still working on refreshments and vending machines for the holding room.
 
Laramie Regional Airport used to have Hertz for rental cars. It is now working on a deal with Enterprise to have Enterprise move their main office and all merchandise out to the airport.
 
The original plan for the renovation included a jet bridge. A jet bridge is a bridge straight from the airplane into the airport. This had to be cut out of the plan due to budget restrictions.
 
The airport is working on getting a surround scanner for security and an x-ray machine, instead of having to search bags.
 
COVID-19 was very hard on the airport, especially during a large construction project. In 2019, the airport saw over 32,000 passengers. There was a dramatic decrease due to the pandemic that is just starting to pick back up.
 
The airport hopes to get back to regular attendance. CARES Act funding was helpful.
 
The airport sees $2.5 million from the federal government, $3 million from the state, and $5.8 million from tax. The total cost is about $11 million.
 
Laramie Regional Airport is looking forward to getting a new sign right at the turnoff to the airport. This will have a beacon so it will be easy to see at night.
 
The airport has been working with the Laramie Chamber Business Alliance to do more with the special walls at the airport that promote Laramie offerings and tourism. If you are interested, contact LCBA.
 
Response: Jaime Stine

Rotary 4-way test
Of the things we think, say, or do
•Is it the Truth?
•Is it Fair?
•Will it build Good Will and Better Friendships?
•Will it be Beneficial to All Concerned?
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the public library children’s book fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
Like us on Facebook!
 
Spoke Editor: Caitlin White, 307-630-1965, cwhite@acplwy.org
May 13, 2021 Meeting Summary 2021-05-17 06:00:00Z 0

May 6, 2021 Meeting Summary

May 6, 2021
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Jaime Stine
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving:
Inspiration:
Professor’s Quote: George Gill
Foundation Flash:
Introduction of Guests:
Guests:
Exchange Students:
Visiting Rotarians:
Junior Rotarians/RYLA/Young RYLA:
Rotaract/Interact Students:
Humor: Todd Pearson
Foundation Drawing: Terry Roark won $10 from the jackpot drawing!
O’Dwyers Drawing: Keith Downey
 
Announcements:
  • Jaime Stine announced that the club will be back in person but you can still attend via Zoom.
  • Remember to let Jaime Stine know if you will be attending the meeting next week. We will meeting out at the airport.
  • Tom Mangan told the club that the MS Walk is next weekend in Cheyenne. Our Rotary team has raised $4,400, and the club will provide a $400 donation.
  • Virtual District Conference registration is open. Sign up today!
 
Rotarian of the Week: Todd Pearson nominated John Bard for another trip around the sun; Murray Schroeder nominated those Rotarians and their families that helped on clean-up day.  
 
Special Presentation: Ron Van Ekeren celebrated a birthday with a gift to the local Rotary Club Foundation.
 
Songs: Happy Birthday, The More We Get Together
 
Program: Sen. Dan Furphy and Rep. Trey Sherwood
 
Introduction: Rollin Abernethy
 
This is Furphy’s first term in the Senate and Sherwood’s first term as a legislator. Sherwood ran in the most crowded race in the state to win House District 14. She is the first women Democrat in that seat. Furphy did a couple terms in the House previously.
 
Sherwood noted that the building is amazing and entering it is a humbling experience. She received a warm welcome.
 
This was a tough session. People keep asking why taxes weren’t implemented. Furphy explained that many moderate legislators were not reelected, and the legislators that came in were very conservative and opposed to taxes.
 
Sherwood had her first individual passed during this year’s session. There is about a 30 percent chance of individual bills passing, so this was an accomplishment. This bill allows Wyoming wineries to hold tastings, which they could not do before.
 
Furphy noted that this session was not fun because there was a need to cut $430 million out of the budget, which ended up cutting 324 positions. This impacts us all. Furphy fought hard against some specific cuts, such as the potential cut of $30 million to disabled residents. He worked hard for this not to go through.  
 
Sherwood thought a low of the session was HB198. This was the UW water system bill. She was disappointed that a Laramie County representative proposed this bill without talking to Albany County representatives. This will have an impact on Laramie and possibly raise water costs.
 
Furphy was disappointed that there were more cuts to education and UW. This was an uphill battle and is still not resolved.
 
A few interesting things coming up are regulation for self-driving semis, a toll road on the interstate, and block chain.
 
Sherwood was excited that Medicaid expansion passed the House for the first time.
 
The House spent seven days on HB173 in regards to education funding. This bill went through a record 26 amendments and it was difficult to find solutions.
 
Furphy noted that the Senate got the cuts down to 3 percent. They tried to raise the starting salary for teachers and increased class size. In the end, the Senate couldn’t come to an agreement, so this will come back up.
 
Response: Caitlin White

Rotary 4-way test
Of the things we think, say, or do
•Is it the Truth?
•Is it Fair?
•Will it build Good Will and Better Friendships?
•Will it be Beneficial to All Concerned?
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the public library children’s book fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
Like us on Facebook!
 
Spoke Editor: Caitlin White, 307-630-1965, cwhite@acplwy.org
May 6, 2021 Meeting Summary 2021-05-11 06:00:00Z 0

August 22, 2019 Meeting Summary

Presiding: Nicole Hauser
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving: Tom Mangan and Ron Van Ekeren
Inspiration: Esther McGann
Professor’s Quote:
Introduction of Guests:
Guests:
Exchange Students: Irene Sottile
Visiting Rotarians: The Konrads
Junior Rotarians:
Rotaract Students:
Humor: Terry
Foundation Drawing: Jenny Eisenhauer won $10 with $469.50 in the jackpot.
O’Dwyers Drawing: Jenny Eisenhauer
 
Announcements:
  • Nicole Hauser passed around an invitation to the Downtown Clinic’s appreciation event. Contact Esther with questions.
Upcoming Programs:
September 5 – Jan Daugaard – Red Cross
September 12 – Rob Godby
September 19 – Gerald Mattinson, UW Cowgirls Basketball
September 26 – Peter Parolin – UW Honors College
 
New Member Induction: Welcome new member Jean Garrison!
 
Rotarians of the Week: Jenny Eisenhauer nominated those Rotarians that donated to the expansion project at the Centennial Library and Cultural Association; Caitlin White nominated Ray McElwee for picking up exchange student, Irene, from the airport; Nicole Hauser nominated the past presidents who are stepping up to help.  
 
Rotarian of the Month: Becky Maddox
 
Songs:
 
Program: UW Creative Writing Program, Jeff Lockwood
 
Introduction: Paul Heimer
 
Jeff Lockwood noted that he was born in Connecticut and then grew up in New Mexico. He has been at UW for 30+ years.
 
Jeff has written several books. In 2000, he started by working on a set of environmental essays that discussed new and better methods for handling grasshoppers, as entomology has a long premise of taking life, and the responsibility that comes with killing insects.
 
He has gone through an academic metamorphosis from starting as a professor in entomology and natural sciences to a professor in humanities teaching philosophy and creativite writing.
 
Jeff wanted to find a way to frame his professional life and tell his story. To do so, he decided to use the Noir genre. The Noir genre is where a deeply flawed hero is seduced by a dame to investigate a crime. The hero solves cases related to his moral principals. In the last 20-25 years, the Noir genre has expanded to explore more with gender and race and has increased its numbers of authors that are of different race or women.
 
Crime noir is uniquely American. It has roots here and has commonly flourished in times of stress and trauma, such as after the Great Depression and during WWII.
 
Jeff is interested in the anti-hero. This person is a main character that is flawed and principled. He takes responsibility for his violence, and lives in a world of moral ambiguity. The anti-hero works and lives in the shadows and margins of society, except when things go wrong and he or she is called on to help.
 
Jeff has invented a new genre of literature, entomological noir. His first book, “Poison Justice,” is a story of science and philosophy woven together. This book has won an independent book award. Other books soon followed.
 
One of his books is set in 1971 in Central Philadelphia and asks the question: who decides what is fair? It explores the line between justice and vengeance.
 
“Murder on the Fly” is a book set in 1981 during the mealfly outbreak in Califormia. This put crops at risk.
 
“Lethal Fetish” is in 1982 and follows the aftermath of 2 individuals who wind up dead. These individuals think they are invested with crawling insects. This book is the darker side and looks at what is normal versus perverse.
 
Stories are the most powerful formation of information where narrative creates a way for fact to come through.
 
Jeff will host “Locust the Opera,” a chamber opera on Saturday, Oct. 5 at 7:30 p.m. This originally premiered in Jackson and has also been shown in Morocco.
 
Response: Jean Garrison
 
Celebrations: Parents with kids going back to school.
 
District Assembly: Saturday, October 5 at Laramie County Community College in Cheyenne.
 
Rotary 4-way test
Of the things we think, say, or do
•Is it the Truth?
•Is it Fair?
•Will it build Good Will and
  Better Friendships?
•Will it be Beneficial to All    
  Concerned?
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the public library children’s book fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
Like us on Facebook!
 
Spoke Editor: Caitlin White, 307-630-1965, cwhite@acplwy.org
August 22, 2019 Meeting Summary 2019-09-12 06:00:00Z 0

November 8, 2018 Meeting Summary

Presiding: Caitlin White
Professor’s Quotes: John Vandel
 
Humor: Todd Pearson
 
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving: Tom Mangan and Ron Van Ekeren
 
Introduction of Guests: Dave Krause
 
Guests:  John Bard introduced the Junior Rotarians
 
Junior Rotarians: Kit Ng and Ben Taboga
 
Visiting Rotarians: Victoria Ziton
 
Foundation Drawing: Jaime Stine won $10 with $1024.50 in the jackpot and 26 cards in the deck.
 
O’Dwyers Drawing: Annette Mello won a $20 gift card from O’Dwyer’s.
 
Announcements:
  • Kit Ng announced that Laramie Interact has re-formed and they are working with Emily Parsons on a winter coat project.
  • Rollin Abernethy announced Dine and Discover in collaboration with Food Bank of the Rockies.
  • Tim Eisenhauer reminded us of Club Visioning on November 9th and asked that everyone bring in their surveys to the next meeting.
  • John Vandel will again be matching members who want to earn Paul Harris Fellow status.
  • Noel Welch is collecting cash for Christmas Families.
  • John Freeman announced that Rotary Reads is again looking for readers – talk to him or Caitlin.
  • Ray McElwee announced that we have recruited an outbound exchange student for next school year and that we will need host families for an inbound student.
  • Caitlin White passed around library books bearing our seal, showing how our speakers are recognized.
 
Rotarians of the Week:  Nicole Hauser nominated Steve Gosar for coaching not one, but three kids’ basketball teams.
 
Special Presentations: Kit Ng received recognition for being a Junior Rotarian.
 
Upcoming Programs:
November 15 –Dale Steenbergen, Greater Cheyenne Chamber of Commerce
November 22 – Thanksgiving, no meeting
November 29 – Bay Roberts/Kierra Peterson, One School at a Time
 
Songs – Jan Lawrence – Shine on Harvest Moon and Rotary Wheel
 
Program: Victoria Ziton, Wyoming Food Bank of the Rockies Victoria Ziton, Wyoming Food Bank of the Rockies
 
Introduction of Program: Tim Eisenhauer
 
The Wyoming Food Bank of the Rockies is now centrally located in Casper after being in Cheyenne for 25 years.  With 13 staff and a new warehouse, they distribute food every year to over 70,000 people in all of Wyoming’s 23 counties.
They primarily deal high protein food, fresh fruits and veggies and dairy products.
The Food Bank is the hub in a distribution wheel that includes 247 partners in Wyoming.  In Albany County, partners include Interfaith Good Samaritan, Cathedral Home, and the Laramie Soup Kitchen.  Partners on the other side of the supply chain include businesses like Safeway, WalMart and Starbucks.  Programs we may be familiar with are Dine and Discover and school backpack programs. 
This is a very efficient program where $1 donated provides 4 meals, and 96 cents of every dollar donated goes directly to food distribution.  Donors include individuals, foundations, and corporations.
The Food Bank of the Rockies also recognizes that some communities with no infrastructure (like our soup kitchen) still have hungry people and they have therefore set up mobile food pantries.
On a regional scale the Food Bank is a part of Feeding America, with a hub in Denver, who directs trucks that need to find a use for produce and also sells or brokers food on a large scale.  They also partner with Food Bank of the Rockies out of Denver.
Overall, the Wyoming Food Bank of the Rockies has a budget of $2.5M annually and distributes 1.5 M pounds of food.  In Albany County alone, they distribute 460,000 pounds of food annually, which equates to 1019 meals/day.
 
Responding for the Club:  Sara Davis
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the public library children’s book fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
 
Rotary 4-way Test:
Of the things we think, say, or do
  • Is it the Truth?
  • Is it Fair?
  • Will it build Good Will and Better Friendships?
  • Will it be Beneficial to all concerned?
 
Spoke Editor: Tony Hoch, 307-760-9386 or tony.hoch@lrcd.net
November 8, 2018 Meeting Summary 2018-11-08 07:00:00Z 0

2017 04 06 Spoke

April 6, 2017 Spoke
Today’s Program:
Darren Parkin
City of Laramie
(update on aquifer protection)
 
March 30, 2017
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Herb Manig
Inspiration: Greg Weisz
Professor’s Quote:
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving: Tom Mangan & Wayne Butler
Guests: .
Exchange Student: Isabelle Bonner
Visiting Rotarians: Billy Addelman, Assistant District Governor, Cheyenne
Junior Rotarians:  
Rotaract Students: Cameron Whiting
Humor: Todd Pearson
Foundation Drawing: Don Prehoda won $10; no joker drawn.
O’Dwyers Drawing: David Hansen won a $20 gift card from O’Dwyers.
 
Upcoming Programs:
April 13 – Andrew Graham, WyoFile (distinguishing facts from fictions)
April 20 – Ken Chestek, American Promise (proposed constitutional amendment)
Apri 27 – Mark Gordon, Wyoming State Treasurer
May 4 – Andy Pannell & Lab School students (Project Citizen)
May 11 – Kelly Neville, Tim Sullivan, Carson Hutchinson - Guatemala
May 18 – Tom Burman, US Athletic Director
May 25 – Mary Flanderka, policy advocate, Wyoming Outdoor Council (natural resource conservation & development)
 
Announcements:
  • Herb Manig noted ‘Thank You’s’ from World Languages Day for support and from LCCC for the Club’s endowed scholarship fund now totaling $19,125.
  • John Bard announced  Sarah Arulsamy, February’s Junior Rotarian, still needs to raise $500 for her trip to California to compete for honors at a DECA function .
  • George Gill displayed the book he co-authored on Easter Island and explained the evolution of his studies.
  • Rollin Abernethy invited Rotarians to participate in Dine & Discover this evening from 4:30-7:00 at LHS.
  • Annette Mello announced on behalf of Nicole Nelson that the Girl Scouts will be selling cookies at Ridley’s on Saturday.
  • Nick Hauser invited young children of Rotarians to visit his company’s ‘hands on’ lab at the Albany County Library parking lot on Saturday from 1:00-5:00 pm.
  • Tom Mangan reminded all of the upcoming MS Walk and  noted examples of monies that returned to the community and reported on a new drug that has been approved by the FDA which treats the primary progressive form of MS.
Rotarian of the Week: George Gill was nominated for his past work and the culmination in the book; Rollin Abernethy was nominated for his work with Dine & Discover; Kelly Neville was nominated for recognition in the Laramie Daily Boomerang article on her Guatemala trip.
 
Rotarian of the Month:  
 
Special Presentation: Jeff Dodds received an addition to his lapel pin recognizing 20 years as a Rotarian.
 
Introduction of Program: Kerry Greaser
 
    Dave Krause, head of UniWyo Federal Credit Union, shared some of his background in investments and financial institutions noting that he had only been in Laramie for 90 days. Married with 7 and 13-year –old daughters, he said he loves Laramie and the West.
    Started in 1959 with 9 employees the credit union now has 26,000 members being served in two locations…on Reynolds and on Grand. He estimated that UniWyo saved members $3.6 million in 2016.
     UniWyo’s commitment to the community is extensive with a long list of beneficiaries who have received money from the CU or donated time by employees.
     Krause noted that UniWyo has a 25% share of the banking market in Laramie, trailing First Interstate Bank which has a 30% share.
     UniWyo wants to grow, to adjust to changing regulations and to add products and services for its members.
     Half of the 18,000 jobs lost last year in Wyoming were in the energy field. The other 9,000 jobs were lost in businesses that averaged 30 employees,  creating a major problem in recovering those jobs.
     He shared statistics on the global level, on China’s economic challenges, the USA’s deficit spending and the increasing debt ($19.4 trillion). There was a notable change in attitudes about the markets between December and January.  The Feds increased rates by 0.25% and three more increases are anticipated in the balance of the year.
  
Responding for the club: Dave Hansen
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the Albany County Public Library’s Children’s Book Fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
 
 
Rotary 4-way Test:
Of the things we think, say, or do
  • Is it the Truth?
  • Is it Fair to all concerned?
  • Will it build Good Will and Better Friendships?
  • Will it be Beneficial to all concerned?
 
Rotary District 5440 conference:
June 1-3, 2017 in Casper
 
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Spoke Editor: Caitlin White
2017 04 06 Spoke 2017-04-07 06:00:00Z 0

2017 03 30 Spoke

March 30, 2017 Spoke
Today’s Program:
Dave Kraus
 UniWyo Federal Credit Union
 
March 23, 2017
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Drew Johnson
Inspiration:
Professor’s Quote:
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving: Tom Mangan & Wayne Butler
Guests: Nick Hauser introduced Chris Rucinski.
 RYLA Students:
Visiting Rotarians:
Junior Rotarians: Sarah Shinstine
Rotaract Students:
Humor: Wayne Butler
Foundation Drawing: Paul Irish won $10, with $722.50 in the jackpot and 39 cards from which to draw.
O’Dwyers Drawing: Kerry Greaser won a $20 gift card from O’Dwyers.
 
Upcoming Programs:
April 6 – Darren Parkin, City of Laramie (update on aquifer protection)
April 13 – Andrew Graham, WyoFile (distinguishing facts from fictions)
April 20 – Ken Chestek, American Promise (proposed constitutional amendment)
Apri 27 – Mark Gordon, Wyoming State Treasurer
May 4 – Andy Pannell & Lab School students (Project Citizen)
May 11 – Doug Faus, Ivinson Memorial Hospital (coming changes in healthcare)
May 18 – Tom Burman, US Athletic Director
May 25 – Mary Flanderka, policy advocate, Wyoming Outdoor Council (natural resource conservation & development)
 
Announcements:
  • John Bard announced  Sarah Arulsamy, Ferbruary’s Junior Rotarian, will be going to California to compete for honors at a DECA function at which she placed 4th in the nation last year. She needs to raise $500 and Bard asked that any members who wished to contribute see him after the meeting.
  • Kelly Neville acknowledged Tim Sullivan and Carson Hutchinson for their participation presented a club banner she received on the Guatemala trip.
  • Kerry Greaser reported that Dine & Discover would be from 5:30-7:00 pm next Thursday at LHS and invited Rotarians to participate.
  • Bob Leonard reported  that the Suicide Prevention training provided before Spring Break was successful and all schools in the city are now on board.
  • Anne Brande announced that the fund raising Downtown Scavenger Hunt on Saturday was open to all with prizes part of the incentive.
  • Drew Johnson announced that the meeting on the question of a Rotary Park would take place after today’s meeting.
 
Rotarian of the Week: Kelly Neville was nominated for her work on the recent Guatemala Rotary trip; Bob Leonard was nominated for his work with the Suicide Prevention Task Force; Nicole Hauser was nominated for being our Rotary Exchange Student Isabelle Bonner’s next host family.
 
Rotarian of the Month:  
 
Special Presentation: Chris Rucinski was inducted into the Club by acting president Johnson.
 
Introduction of Program: Doug Faus
 
    Guy Warpness, board member of Ivinson Memorial Hospital, spoke on transitioning of IMH to a 501(c)(3) non-profit entity.  The process began a number of years ago when a committee was appointed to evaluate the benefits and  methodology of becoming a 501(c)(3).
    The rationale for change lies in changing industry dynamics.
Government-run healthcare is declining across the country and more county-run hospitals are failing financially. A 501(c)(3) entity can grow faster and more meaningfully than a district hospital and would have an increased ability to improve operations, recruit talent, manage assets and pursue potential partnerships.
    At this time the board is strong and cohesive and IMH would be making the transition from a position of strength. The Governance Structure Committee has recommended proceeding with the exploration with the following objectives in mind: improved quality of healthcare, improved financial position and improved community benefit. The board is looking for possible implementation in the 4th quarter of 2017.
    Responsibility for the organization would include a 501(c)(3) board of directors with accountability to a district board. Hospital leadership management would report to the CEO and the CEO and board committees would be accountable to the 501(c)(3) board.
    The Ivinson Memorial Hospital Foundation, a 501(c)(3) entity, would stay the same.
  
Responding for the club: Dave Hansen
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the Albany County Public Library’s Children’s Book Fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
 
Rotary 4-way Test:
Of the things we think, say, or do
  • Is it the Truth?
  • Is it Fair to all concerned?
  • Will it build Good Will and Better Friendships?
  • Will it be Beneficial to all concerned?
 
Rotary District 5440 conference:
June 1-3, 2017 in Casper
 
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Spoke Editor: Caitlin White
2017 03 30 Spoke 2017-04-04 06:00:00Z 0

Spoke March 16, 2017

March 16, 2017 Spoke
Today’s Program: Joe Sery, Tungsten Heavy Powder & Parts
 
March 9, 2017
Meeting Summary
Presiding: Herb Manig
Inspiration:
Meeting Room setup/takedown and general problem solving: Don Brosz with help from Tom Mangan & Wayne Butler
Guests: Todd Pearson introduced prospective member J.J. Harrisl Kristen Peterson introduced prospective member Tom Ver Ploeg. 
RYLA Students:
Visiting Rotarians:
Rotaract Students: Cameron Whiting
Professor’s Quote:
Humor: Wayne Butler
Foundation Drawing: George Gill won $10, with 38 cards in the deck and $664.50 in the jackpot.
O’Dwyers Drawing: Paul Heimer won a $20 gift card from O’Dwyers.
 
Upcoming Programs:
March 23 – Guy Warpness, Ivinson Memorial Hospital
March 30 – Dave Krause, UniWyo Federal Credit Union
 
Announcements:
  • Herb Manig read a note from a duck race ticket purchaser. There was a mix-up with his check for tickets totally $25. He sent in a donation of $100 to the club to make up for the lost check.
  • Larry Struempf asked the club to consider a new Rotary Park plan. Renaming Optimist Park in West Laramie is not an option, but there is the possibility of naming the Imperial Heights park that is being constructed near the new high school Rotary Park. A vote from the membership will be needed before this project moves forward.
  • Keith Downey needs volunteers and donations for Relay for Life on April 21 and 22.
  • Tom Mangan told the club that the MS Walk will be April 15 this year. To sign up, members should visit walkmswyoming.org and look up the team Rotary Walks.
 
Rotarian of the Week: Tim Sullivan nominated Kermit Brown for his appointment to the University of Wyoming Board of Trustees and Phil Nicholas for being back following a liver transplant.
 
Rotarian of the Month: Becky Maddox
 
Special Presentation: Annette Mello gave a presentation on Club Runner, the club’s new website portal. Club Runner is more efficient and will give the club a better online presence. Annette will send out the PowerPoint presentation and other information to the club via email.
Introduction of Program: Dave Hansen
 
Tom Hudson, the head coach for Laramie High School Swimming spoke to the club. Hudson has coached swimming fro 27 years and has had 11 state championship teams at Laramie High School. He was the 2016 Swimming & Diving Coach of the Year.
 
Hudson gave a brief history of swimming at LHS. The girls swim team has been state champions 15 times since 1962. The boys swim team has been state champions 20 times since 1962 for a total of 35 championships.
 
Laramie High School has had many All American swimmers. To qualify, the swimmer must be in the top 100 swimmers in the event. Hudson told the club that one freshman female is on the way to being an All American.
 
This season, both the girls and boys swim team went 15:2.
 
Before the new facility at LHS was built, the swim teams held meets at the Laramie Rec Center and practiced at the old Laramie High School.
 
When the new facility was being built, Hudson assisted the architects in planning the pool area. The pool now has the capacity for state meets and is one of the best facilities in the country, especially for diving.
 
Hudson expects that the facility will hold 2-3 meets per year for swim clubs totaling 600 swimmers a meet.
 
LHS will be the host of state meets starting in 2018. The pool has 13 lanes. Ten lanes make up the championship pool and three lanes are for warm up and cool down.
 
The pool’s original bulkhead, which makes the pool a flex pool, was designed poorly. LHS is getting a new bulkhead. The new one will be stainless steel.
 
The pool also has a full video scoreboard. The scoreboard cost about $180,000. A portion of the scoreboard was provided by a grant for $64,000. The scoreboard is from Colorado Timing Systems. It’s enhanced equipment that can show awards ceremonies, life action, and leader boards. It is 17 feet tall and 10 feet wide.
 
Responding for the club: Kelly Wolfe
 
Response: The Rotary Club of Laramie will make a donation to the Albany County Public Library’s Children’s Book Fund in the speaker’s name.
NOTE: We Do Not Donate a Book!
 
Rotary 4-way Test:
Of the things we think, say, or do
  • Is it the Truth?
  • Is it Fair?
  • Will it build Good Will and Better Friendships?
  • Will it be Beneficial to all concerned?
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Spoke Editor: Caitlin White
Spoke March 16, 2017 2017-03-20 06:00:00Z 0

Helping people with disabilities make their own music

Music has been an important part of leading an ordinary life for students at the Music School for Children With Disabilities in Honor of Paul Harris in Lublin, Poland. Founded by Rotary members, the school serves 20 students with various disabilities, including Down syndrome, autism, and visual impairments. The Rotary Club of Lublin-Centrum-Maria Curie-Sklodowska has provided funding with help from Rotary Foundation Matching Grants and the Henryk Wieniawski Musical Society, which houses the school.
 
After their son Mateusz was born with underdeveloped eyes, Mariusz and Joanna Kania looked for ways to help him be active. When he showed an aptitude for music, they looked for a teacher and were thrilled to find the Paul Harris music school.
Helping people with disabilities make their own music 2015-05-01 00:00:00Z 0

Finding Safe Haven

For years, Angalia Bianca had slept in abandoned buildings throughout Chicago. She stole. She did drugs. She spent time in and out of jail for forgery, theft, trespassing, and possession of narcotics. But after she landed in prison for the seventh time, something changed -- Bianca knew she wanted a better life. She just didn’t know how to make it happen.
 
After serving her time, Bianca sought help from a local homeless organization, A Safe Haven, and moved to its shelter in the Rogers Park neighborhood. Bianca followed the program closely -- she attended all the required meetings, passed drug tests, and volunteered at every opportunity.
Finding Safe Haven 2015-05-01 00:00:00Z 0

Saving lives in Ghana

What is it like taking a large team to Africa?  It has probably been one of the most rewarding experiences in my life. In mid February, I began leading Rotary members from all over the East Coast of the United States through Ghana. I’ve tried to give the team a warm Ghanaian welcome like I’ve received on my earlier trips. A large trip is a real blessing because each person sees Ghana and our work in a different way.

A highlight for the team was greeting the chief of Sagadugu. The team got excited about buying goats and food for children in the villages where I support eight churches. It was good to see the pastors of most of the eight churches, and I had to explain that we were just passing through on our way to Bolgatanga.
Saving lives in Ghana 2015-05-01 00:00:00Z 0

India celebrates three years without polio

Throughout India and around the world, Rotary clubs are celebrating a major milestone: India has gone three years without a new case of polio. The last reported case was a two-year-old girl in West Bengal on 13 January 2011. To mark this historic triumph, Rotary clubs illuminated landmarks and iconic structures throughout the country with four simple but powerful words, "India is polio free."
 
The three-year achievement sets the stage for polio-free certification of the entire Southeast Asia region by the World Health Organization. The Indian government also plans to convene a polio summit in February to commemorate this victory in the global effort to eradicate polio.
 
India celebrates three years without polio 2014-02-26 00:00:00Z 0